Stop Fracking Our Future

Stop Fracking Our Future

Across the country, fracking is contaminating drinking water, making nearby families sick with air pollution, and turning forest acres into industrial zones. Yet the oil and gas industry is pushing to expand this dirty drilling — to new states and even near critical drinking water supplies for millions of Americans.

We need to show massive public support to stop the oil and gas industry from fracking our future.

Credit: Sam Malone

Fracking is threatening our environment and health

As fracking booms across the nation, it is creating a staggering array of threats to our environment and health: 

Our drinking water

There are already more than 1,000 documented cases of water contamination from fracking operations — from toxic wastewater, well blowouts, chemical spills and more. Moreover, fracking uses millions of gallons of water.

Yet the oil and gas industry wants to bring fracking to places like the Delaware River Basin, which provides drinking water for 15 million people, and Otero Mesa, which hosts the largest untapped aquifer in parched New Mexico.

Credit: B. Mark Schmerling

Our forests and parks

Our national parks and national forests are the core of America’s natural heritage. Yet federal officials are considering leases for fracking on the outskirts of Mesa Verde National Monument, along the migration corridor for Grand Teton’s pronghorn antelope, and right inside several of our national forests.

Along with air and water pollution, fracking would degrade these beautiful places with wellpads, waste pits, compressors, pipelines, noisy machinery and thousands of truck trips. 

Credit: National Energy Technology Laboratory

Our health 

Families living on the frontlines of fracking have suffered nausea, headaches, rashes, dizziness and other illnesses. Some doctors are calling these reported incidents "the tip of the iceberg."

We must act now to stop the damage of dirty drilling

In April 2016, we released our report, "Fracking By The Numbers," which looks at the damage to our water, land and climate from a decade of dirty drilling. The report concludes that to address the environmental and public health threats from fracking across the nation, states should prohibit fracking. No plausible system of regulation appears likely to address the scale and severity of fracking’s impacts.

In places where fracking does continue to take place:

  • Fracking should be subject to all relevant environmental laws. Federal policymakers must close the loopholes exempting fracking from key provisions of our nation’s environmental laws.
  • Our most important natural areas should be kept off limits. Federal officials should ban fracking on our public lands, including national parks, national forests, and sources of drinking water.
  • The oil and gas industry — not taxpayers, communities or families — should pay the costs of damage caused by fracking. Policymakers should require robust financial assurance from fracking operators at every well site.
  • The public’s right to know about fracking’s environmental damage must be respected. More complete data on fracking should be collected and made available to the public, enabling us to understand the full extent of the harm that fracking causes to our environment and health.

Issue updates

News Release | Environment New Jersey

NJ, NY and Delaware Governors Provide the 3 Votes Needed to Halt Progress on Dangerous, Unwanted LNG Export Terminal

the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) announced at their virtual meeting decision this morning to delay a decision on whether or not to approve permits for the proposed controversial liquid natural gas (LNG) New Fortress Energy Gibbstown, NJ port so the Commissioners could further assess the voluminous record and take a “careful look” at complex issues involved; and stay any construction there until final permit decisions are made by the DRBC Commissioners with a public vote.  The three votes needed for passage of the delay and stay were cast by the NY, NJ and Delaware representatives. Pennsylvania abstained and the Trump Administration voted against the delay and stay. In a storm of controversy, the public had weighed in with over 71,000 petition signatures to DRBC to stop the project.

 

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

Our decades-long campaign to defend the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is not over | Steve Blackledge

The Trump administration announced Monday that it will begin oil leasing in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. We've been working for decades to protect this 19 million acre wilderness, and we're not giving up now.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

A new wave of legislation against offshore drilling | Kelsey Lamp

Earlier this month, a group of legislators from both coasts signed onto a wave of eight bills in Congress aimed at blocking the Trump administration’s offshore drilling plan.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment New Jersey

In Big Climate Win, President Obama Drops Arctic Ocean From Off-Shore Drilling Plans

In a win for our oceans and climate, the Obama Administration finalized its oil and gas leasing program, which provides protection for the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans, from risky oil and gas drilling for the next five years. The initial 2017 to 2022 Outer Continental Shelf leasing plan proposed by the Obama Administration in January 2015 threatened beaches all along the Atlantic Coast, including the Jersey Shore, and both Chukchi and Beaufort Seas in the Arctic Ocean. With the incoming Trump administration, permament protections for our protected oceans becomes even more paramount.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center

Gasland’s Trojan Horse: DEP Wetland Hearing on Transco Compressor Station in Burlco Exposes Vulnerability of Gas Pipelines

NJDEP will hold the first of two hearings regarding DEP’s environmental review of the New Jersey Natural Gas pipeline through Burlington, Monmouth and Ocean Counties and its attendant fossil fuel infrastructure. Tonight’s hearing focuses on the proposed Garden State Expansion Transco compressor station, and its application for freshwater wetlands permits to NJDEP to destroy more than six acres of Chesterfield wetlands.
Beyond the environmental threats of the compressor station, which is near residential neighborhoods, it would provide a fossil fuel conduit to transport gas for New Jersey Natural Gas's proposed pipeline through the heart of the Pinelands.

> Keep Reading

Pages

View AllRSS Feed